Health Tip #68

Health Tip 68

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Health Tip #41

health-tip-41

Past hurts and traumas have  very real effects on our health.  Health disciplines across the board, from holistic healers, to acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine to modern mainstream medicine, all understand this connection.

Past Hurts and Traumas Can Make Us Fat

Jon Gabriel, author of The Gabriel Method, who weighed 409 lbs at his heaviest, explains about emotional obesity.  Emotional obesity is caused by traumatic events that cause our bodies to hold on to weight as a form of protection.  Jon uses  a number of techniques to overcome past trauma including visualization and doing a rewrite of past traumatic experiences.  Remember when we talked about how diets don’t work and how cravings for junk food aren’t really your fault?  When former life saving adaptations have become maladaptive and health damaging, this is part of the emotional obesity mechanism.

Past Hurts and Traumas Can Make Us Sick

Pediatrician, Dr. Nadine Burke Harris describes ACE’s (or Adverse Childhood Experiences) and toxic stress as childhood traumas that occurred before the age of 18 which have lifelong negative health effects.   Some of these childhood traumas include: physical, emotional and sexual abuse, physical or emotional neglect, parental mental illness, substance abuse, incarceration, parental separation or divorce and domestic violence. These ACE’s alter brain development, immune system development, hormonal systems and the way our DNA is read and transcribed.   17,500 adults studied, showed that the greater the number of ACE’s they suffered as children, the greater the negative health effects in their lives. Some of these negative health effects included greater susceptibility to:  heart disease, hepatitis, depression, suicidal thoughts and cancer.

It’s Not Even Our Trauma

Research has shown that another adaptation is at work when it comes to trauma.  Traumas suffered by our parents and grandparents may be genetically passed down to us.  Information about traumatic situations can be passed down from generation to generation so that successive generations can more easily adapt to their environment.  The trouble is, if our parents or grandparents lived through a war, and they pass that adaptation down to us, we may be living our lives as if we are constantly under attack and constantly in danger.

Methods for Healing Trauma

Fortunately there are methods available to us for healing past traumas.   These methods include mental health care, nutrition, holistic interventions and in some cases medication.  Many of mental health techniques for healing center around the idea of changing our beliefs about the past situations.  Some ways that we can change past beliefs are by doing visualizations and rewrites as Jon Gabriel describes.  Positive affirmations (thoughts) to replace the negative thoughts should be done regularly.  EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique) and Faster EFT are techniques we can learn to do ourselves and involve tapping on acupressure points while bringing up emotionally traumatic events, feeling the emotions of them, releasing and letting them go.  Questioning away negative thoughts and feelings, as in Byron Katie’s The Work, is also an effective method.  In this method we learn to question our stories we create about our life events and to see the positive in every situation we have gone through.  Relaxation techniques such as meditation and focusing on gratitude are helpful techniques we have already discussed.

Health Tip #7

health-tip-7

Back in health tip #1, I asked you to start a  start a wellness journal and write down your why for embarking on a new healthy living regime. In that same journal, if you haven’t started already, it’s time to start recording what you eat and how you feel throughout your day.  No one else need see this journal but yourself, so please be honest and record everything you eat.  No one is going to judge you for it, not even you!  Right?  Information is power.   I have found this to be an invaluable tool to find out where I’m on track and where I’m doing a lot of unconscious and emotional eating and when I’m eating for a pick-me-up, not necessarily out of hunger.  It’s a great way to examine your habits.  If I asked you, most of you would tell me that you eat a pretty healthy diet.  That’s that slippery mind thing again and the power of writing things down.  Most of us know how to eat a healthy diet, but we make little concessions all the time, “oh, just one, I deserve a treat, if I eat it quickly and if no one sees, it doesn’t count”.  Writing it down helps you stay accountable to yourself and on track with your goals.   It also helps you see where you might be sensitive to certain foods and notice dips in energy during the day when you go looking for caffeine or something sweet to bolster you up.  Please also remember to write down how you’re feeling as well, both physically and emotionally.  Are you bloated, gassy, achy?  Do you feel tired, irritable, sad?  The more information you record, the better tool your journal is going to be for you to make the appropriate and necessary changes to reach your goals.  And don’t forget to reward yourself for the things you did for your health and for your accomplishments, no matter how small. I add exclamation marks and happy faces for myself whenever I do something that is in line with my goals.  Remembering to drink my water, making myself a green juice or a smoothie, eating a big salad, working out, going for a hike or mountain biking in the forest are all things that get a smiley face reward in my journal! 🙂