Health Tip #21

health-tip-21

Further to my previous post on eliminating gluten, let’s take a further look into an elimination diet.  In previous post we have talked about the microbiome and how important a healthy gut is to our overall health and what can happen when the gut is compromised.  Certain foods tend to be more problematic when it comes to food allergies and sensitives.  Some of the more problematic foods include:  wheat and gluten containing grains, soy, corn, pasteurized dairy, lactose, peanuts, tree-nuts, eggs, fish, shellfish and citrus.  This is where your food and mood journal comes in handy.  Food preservatives and additives can also be problematic.

If you think you are sensitive to any one of these common problem foods, try eliminating it completely, in all forms, from your diet for a week.  When you add it back in, try to eat quite a bit of it.  Eat it for every meal if you can.  Watch for any signs of reaction and record them in your journal.  You can eliminate these foods singularly, one at a time or do a complete elimination diet where all of the suspect foods are eliminated at once.  These foods should be added back one at a time while watching for and recording any reactions.  Some signs and symptoms to watch for might be digestive upset, bloating, gas, cramps, diarrhea, rash, eczema, breathing problems, stuffy or runny nose, agitation, emotional upset, brain fog, headaches, loss of energy fatigue or muscle aches.

While we are discussing removing problem foods, we might also consider not only eliminating foods that we are potentially sensitive to but also foods that are not serving us in other ways.  Some of these foods include: animal products raised with growth hormones and anti-biotics that disrupt our own hormone levels, sugary foods that disrupt our insulin and leptin levels, caffeine that stimulates stress hormones, and gluten grains that may have a negative affect on the thyroid.